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The Soviet intervention, codenamed "Operation Whirlwind", was launched by Marshal [[Ivan Konev]].<ref name=unhungary>UN General Assembly ''Special Committee on the Problem of Hungary'' (1957) {{PDF|[http://mek.oszk.hu/01200/01274/01274.pdf Chapter IV. E (Logistical deployment of new Soviet troops), para 181 (p. 56)]|1.47&nbsp;[[Mebibyte|MiB]]<!-- application/pdf, 1548737 bytes -->}}</ref> The [[Southern Group of Forces|five Soviet divisions stationed in Hungary]] before October 23 were augmented to a total strength of 17 divisions.<ref>{{cite book| last = Györkei| first = Jenõ| coauthors = Kirov, Alexandr; Horvath, Miklos| title = Soviet Military Intervention in Hungary, 1956| publisher = Central European University Press| year = 1999| location = New York| url = |pages = 350| isbn = 963-9116-36-X}}</ref> The 8th Mechanized Army under command of Lieutenant General [[Hamazasp Babadzhanian]] and the 38th Army under command of Lieutenant General [[Hadzhi-Umar Mamsurov]] from the nearby [[Carpathian Military District]] were deployed to Hungary for the operation.
 
The Soviet intervention, codenamed "Operation Whirlwind", was launched by Marshal [[Ivan Konev]].<ref name=unhungary>UN General Assembly ''Special Committee on the Problem of Hungary'' (1957) {{PDF|[http://mek.oszk.hu/01200/01274/01274.pdf Chapter IV. E (Logistical deployment of new Soviet troops), para 181 (p. 56)]|1.47&nbsp;[[Mebibyte|MiB]]<!-- application/pdf, 1548737 bytes -->}}</ref> The [[Southern Group of Forces|five Soviet divisions stationed in Hungary]] before October 23 were augmented to a total strength of 17 divisions.<ref>{{cite book| last = Györkei| first = Jenõ| coauthors = Kirov, Alexandr; Horvath, Miklos| title = Soviet Military Intervention in Hungary, 1956| publisher = Central European University Press| year = 1999| location = New York| url = |pages = 350| isbn = 963-9116-36-X}}</ref> The 8th Mechanized Army under command of Lieutenant General [[Hamazasp Babadzhanian]] and the 38th Army under command of Lieutenant General [[Hadzhi-Umar Mamsurov]] from the nearby [[Carpathian Military District]] were deployed to Hungary for the operation.
   
At 3:00 a.m. on November 4, Soviet tanks penetrated Budapest along the Pest side of the Danube in two thrusts—one from the south, and one from the north—thus splitting the city in half. Armored units crossed into Buda, and at 4:25 a.m. fired the first shots at the army barracks on Budaõrsi road. Soon after, Soviet artillery and tank fire was heard in all districts of Budapest. Operation Whirlwind combined air strikes, artillery, and the coordinated tank-infantry action of 17 divisions. By 8:00 am organised defence of the city evaporated after the radio station was seized, and many defenders fell back to fortified positions. Hungarian civilians bore the brunt of the fighting, and it was often impossible for Soviet troops to differentiate military from civilian targets.<ref name=unhungary/> For this reason, Soviet tanks often crept along main roads firing indiscriminately into buildings. Hungarian resistance was strongest in the industrial areas of Budapest, which were heavily targeted by Soviet artillery and air strikes.<ref name=unhungary/> The [[Csepel|last pocket of resistance]] called for ceasefire on 10 November. Over 2,500 Hungarians and 722 Soviet troops had been killed and thousands more were wounded.<ref>Mark Kramer, “The Soviet Union and the 1956 Crises in Hungary and Poland: Reassessments and New Findings”, ''Journal of Contemporary History'', Vol.33, No.2, April 1998, p.210.</ref><ref>Péter Gosztonyi, "Az 1956-os forradalom számokban", ''Népszabadság'' (Budapest), 3 November 1990.</ref>
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At 3:00 a.m. on November 4, Soviet tanks penetrated Budapest along the Pest side of the Danube in two thrusts—one from the south, and one from the north—thus splitting the city in half. Armored units crossed into [[Buda]], and at 4:25 a.m. fired the first shots at the army barracks on Budaõrsi road. Soon after, Soviet artillery and tank fire was heard in all districts of Budapest. Operation Whirlwind combined air strikes, artillery, and the coordinated tank-infantry action of 17 divisions. By 8:00 am organised defence of the city evaporated after the radio station was seized, and many defenders fell back to fortified positions. Hungarian civilians bore the brunt of the fighting, and it was often impossible for Soviet troops to differentiate military from civilian targets.<ref name=unhungary/> For this reason, Soviet tanks often crept along main roads firing indiscriminately into buildings. Hungarian resistance was strongest in the industrial areas of Budapest, which were heavily targeted by Soviet artillery and air strikes.<ref name=unhungary/> The [[Csepel|last pocket of resistance]] called for ceasefire on 10 November. Over 2,500 Hungarians and 722 Soviet troops had been killed and thousands more were wounded.<ref>Mark Kramer, “The Soviet Union and the 1956 Crises in Hungary and Poland: Reassessments and New Findings”, ''Journal of Contemporary History'', Vol.33, No.2, April 1998, p.210.</ref><ref>Péter Gosztonyi, "Az 1956-os forradalom számokban", ''Népszabadság'' (Budapest), 3 November 1990.</ref>
   
 
==After the Hungarian Revolution==
 
==After the Hungarian Revolution==

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