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The Canadian Army is not an independent service. Rather it is the component responsible for the training and maintenance of operational readiness of the land forces of Canada's unified defence forces, known as the Canadian Armed Forces.

The Canadian Army is commanded from National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa and has been subdivided into five divisions as of December 2015:[1]

Each division is responsible for the regular army and reserve forces located within its geographical purview – all except the 5th Canadian Division has a regular army mechanised brigade group under its command, together with between two and three militia brigades.

Structure of the Canadian Land Forces

Each mechanised brigade group contains three infantry battalions, an armoured regiment, an artillery regiment, and a combat engineer regiment. Each brigade group also contains a service support battalion, signals squadron and military police platoon.

In addition to the four divisions, the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre, commanded by a major-general and headquartered at McNaughton Barracks, CFB Kingston, Ontario, is responsible for the supervision, integration and delivery of army training and long-range planning for army training and doctrine development, including simulation and digitization. It includes a number of schools and training organizations, such as the Combat Training Centre at CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick, and the Canadian Manoeuvre Training Centre at CFB Wainwright, Alberta.[2]

A regular light infantry battalion in the regular Royal Canadian Infantry Corps are made of 4 companies, 3 light trained as urban, marine, coastal patrol, mountain, and arctic infantry, plus 1 parachute company (Royal 22nd Regiment has 2 parachute companies and 2 light infantry).

Regular units have no changes, reserve units have the sub-title of (PR). Note on units: Although technically not part of the Canadian Army, the Royal Canadian Medical Service will be included in the lists below.

1st Canadian Division[edit | edit source]

The 1st Canadian Division is not under 'direct' control of Canadian Army, as it is part of the Canadian Joint Operations Command, but is listed here as it is an army formation.

2nd Canadian Division[edit | edit source]

The 2nd Canadian Division covers the region of Quebec.

2nd Canadian Division Support Group[edit | edit source]

5th Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

34th Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

35th Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

3rd Canadian Division[edit | edit source]

The 3rd Canadian Division covers Western Canada.

3rd Canadian Division Support Group[edit | edit source]

1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

38 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

39 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

41 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

4th Canadian Division[edit | edit source]

The 4th Canadian Division covers Ontario.

4th Canadian Division Support Group[edit | edit source]

2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

31 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

32 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

33 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

5th Canadian Division[edit | edit source]

The 5th Canadian Division covers the Atlantic Provinces.

5th Canadian Division Support Group[edit | edit source]

36 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

37 Canadian Brigade Group[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Archived copy". http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/news-nouvelles/news-nouvelles-eng.asp?id=4880. 
  2. Department of National Defence, 2011. Leader in Land Operations: LFDTS Land Force Doctrine and Training System

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