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Thomas Wells
Born 1759
Died 31 October 1811
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom Royal Navy
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Melampus
HMS Defence
HMS Glory
Nore Command
Battles/wars French Revolutionary Wars

Vice Admiral Thomas Wells (1759 – 31 October 1811) was a Royal Navy officer who became Commander-in-Chief, The Nore.

Naval careerEdit

Wells joined the Royal Navy in 1774. He became commanding officer of the frigate HMS Melampus in early 1794 during the French Revolutionary Wars.[1] During this time Melampus participated in the Action of 23 April 1794, during which the British took three vessels, Engageante, Pomone, and Babet.[2] Melampus had five men killed and five wounded.[3] He went on to be commanding officer of the third-rate HMS Defence later in 1794 and commanding officer of the second-rate HMS Glory in 1799.[1] He acted as a pallbearer at the funeral of Lord Nelson in October 1805.[1] After that he became Commander-in-Chief, The Nore in 1807[4] and was promoted to Vice Admiral of the Red in 1808.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "Admiral Wells: History". http://www.admiralwells.co.uk/admiral-wells-history/. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 
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  4. Winfield, p. 17

SourcesEdit

Military offices
Preceded by
Lord Keith
Commander-in-Chief, The Nore
1807–1810
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Stanhope

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