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M1A1 Abrams pose for a photo under the "Hands of Victory" in Ceremony Square, Baghdad, Iraq.

The following is a timeline of major events during the Multinational Force's Occupation of Iraq, following the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

2003[edit | edit source]

March[edit | edit source]

April[edit | edit source]

May[edit | edit source]

June[edit | edit source]

  • June 15: The U.S. military begins Operation Desert Scorpion, a series of raids across Iraq intended to find Iraqi resistance and heavy weapons.

July[edit | edit source]

  • July 2: President Bush challenges those attacking US troops to "Bring 'em on!"
  • July 13: The Iraqi Governing Council is established under the authority of the US Coalition Provisional Authority.
  • July 22: Uday and Qusay Hussein, Saddam Hussein's sons, are killed in Mosul

August[edit | edit source]

  • August 29: Influential Shiite cleric Ayatollah Mohammed Baqr al-Hakim is killed in a car bomb blast as he leaves his mosque after Friday prayers. At least 84 others are killed.

September[edit | edit source]

  • September 3: First post-Saddam government.
  • September 23: Gallup poll shows majority of Iraqis expect better life in 5 years. Around two-thirds of Baghdad residents state the Iraqi dictator's removal was worth the hardships they've been forced to endure.

October[edit | edit source]

  • October 2: David Kay's Iraq Survey Group report finds little evidence of WMD in Iraq, although the regime did intend to develop more weapons with additional capabilities. Such plans and programs appear to have been dormant, the existence of these though were concealed from UNSCOM during the inspections that began in 2002. Weapons inspectors in Iraq did find a clandestine "network of biological laboratories" and a deadly strain of botulinum. The US-sponsored search for WMD has so far cost $300 million and is projected to cost around $600 million more.

November[edit | edit source]

  • November 2: In the heaviest single loss for the coalition troops up to that time, two US Chinook helicopters are fired on by two surface-to-air missiles and one crashes near Fallujah and on its way to Baghdad airport; 16 soldiers are killed and 20 wounded.[5][6]
  • November 12: A suicide truck bomb blows up the Italian headquarters in Nasiriyah, killing 19 Italians (17 of them soldiers) and 14 Iraqis.
  • November 15: The Governing Council unveils an accelerated timetable for transferring the country to Iraqi control.
  • November 22: 2003 Baghdad DHL attempted shoot down incident: An Airbus A-300 freighter belonging to German courier firm DHL is forced to make an emergency landing with a wing fire,All 3 hydraulics lost.Using different engine power to land the aircraft, after being struck by a portable shoulder-fired SA-14 missile.
  • November 27: U.S. President George W. Bush makes a stealthy Thanksgiving Day visit to Baghdad (the White House having announced that he would be at home with his family) in an attempt to boost morale among the troops and ordinary Iraqis. Bush is accompanied by National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, and he is flown in to Baghdad International Airport aboard Air Force One.[7][8][9]
  • November 30: The US military reports killing 46 militants and wounding 18 in clashes in the central city of Samarra. The reports are later called into question as reporters interview residents of the city. Hospital staff only reports eight dead - most or all of them civilians, including an elderly Iranian pilgrim. No bodies of dead guerrillas are found.

December[edit | edit source]

2004[edit | edit source]

January[edit | edit source]

February[edit | edit source]

  • February 21: U.S. permits Red Cross to visit Saddam Hussein for first time since his capture in December.

March[edit | edit source]

April[edit | edit source]

  • April 4: Beginning of violent clashes between the coalition and followers of Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, which will end at the end of August 2004.

May[edit | edit source]

June[edit | edit source]

July[edit | edit source]

  • July 20: Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, President of the Philippines, confirms that hostage Angelo de la Cruz has been freed by his captors after their demands for a one-month-early withdrawal of all 51 Filipino troops from Iraq were met.

August[edit | edit source]

September[edit | edit source]

  • September 30: A car bomb strikes an American Humvee handing out candy to children, killing up to 35 children.

October[edit | edit source]

November[edit | edit source]

December[edit | edit source]

2005[edit | edit source]

January[edit | edit source]

February[edit | edit source]

  • February 28: 2005 Al Hillah bombing: In the deadliest single blast up to that time, a car bomb kills 127 in Hillah; the identity of the bomber as a Jordanian caused a diplomatic row between Iraq and Jordan.

March[edit | edit source]

April[edit | edit source]

  • April 28: The Parliament votes its trust towards the new government.

May[edit | edit source]

  • May 8: Battle of Al Qaim, US aiming to stop the flow of foreign fighters into Iraq.
  • May 15 Formation of the parliamentary commission charged of the draft of the new Constitution.

July[edit | edit source]

August[edit | edit source]

  • August 15: Unable to find a consensus between the main political leaders, the Parliament postpones for a week the transmission of the draft constitution to its members.
  • August 22: The constitution's draft is presented to the Iraqi Parliament.
  • August 28: The constitution is presented to parliament.

September[edit | edit source]

October[edit | edit source]

November[edit | edit source]

December[edit | edit source]

  • December 14 - U.S. President George W. Bush says that the decision to invade Iraq in 2003 was the result of faulty intelligence, and accepts responsibility for that decision. He maintains that his decision was still justified.
  • December 15 Iraqi legislative election, December 2005

2006[edit | edit source]

February[edit | edit source]

March[edit | edit source]

April[edit | edit source]

  • April 24: Hamdania incident. Marines allegedly abduct an Iraqi civilian from a house, kill him, and place components and spent AK-47 cartridges near his body to make it appear he was planting an IED.

May[edit | edit source]

June[edit | edit source]

July[edit | edit source]

August[edit | edit source]

October[edit | edit source]

November[edit | edit source]

  • November 7 - The United States midterm elections removed the Republican Party from control of both chambers of the United States Congress. The failings in the Iraq War were cited as one of the main causes of the Republicans' defeat, even though the Bush administration had attempted to distance itself from its earlier "stay the course" rhetoric.[11]
  • November 19: Ammar al-Saffar, Deputy Health Minister, becomes the highest-ranking Iraqi to be kidnapped.

December[edit | edit source]

2007[edit | edit source]

January[edit | edit source]

February[edit | edit source]

March[edit | edit source]

April[edit | edit source]

May[edit | edit source]

June[edit | edit source]

July[edit | edit source]

August[edit | edit source]

September[edit | edit source]

2008[edit | edit source]

January[edit | edit source]

February[edit | edit source]

March[edit | edit source]

July[edit | edit source]

October[edit | edit source]

November[edit | edit source]

2009[edit | edit source]

January[edit | edit source]

May[edit | edit source]

July 25[edit | edit source]

  • Iraqi Kurdistan legislative election, 2009

August[edit | edit source]

October[edit | edit source]

December[edit | edit source]

2010[edit | edit source]

March[edit | edit source]

  • March 7: Iraqi parliamentary election, 2010

August[edit | edit source]

  • August 18: American combat operations in Iraq end as its last combat brigade departs for Kuwait.[16]

September[edit | edit source]

  • September 30: 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment conducted a Transition of Authority with 3rd BDE, 3rd ID and assumed responsibility for the five northern Provinces of United States Division-South under MG Vincent Brooks and the 1st Infantry Division.[17]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "U.S. launches cruise missiles at Saddam". cnn.com. March 20, 2003. http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/meast/03/19/sprj.irq.main/. 
  2. United States Library of Congress;; (August 5, 2011). "Iraq War, 2003 Web Archive". loc.gov. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/lcwa/html/iraq/iraq-overview.html. 
  3. New York Times (April 10, 2003). "The Fall of Baghdad". nytimes.com. http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/10/opinion/the-fall-of-baghdad.html. 
  4. http://www.iraqcoalition.org/regulations/20030823_CPAORD_2_Dissolution_of_Entities_with_Annex_A.pdf
  5. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=DWZGY4XS5WOC4CRBAEZSFFA?type=topNews&storyID=3737651. [dead link]
  6. "U.S. helicopter shot down in Iraq". CNN. November 2, 2003. http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/meast/11/02/sprj.irq.int.main/index.html. Retrieved April 10, 2010. 
  7. "Bush Makes Surprise Visit to Troops in Baghdad – Fox News". Fox News. October 20, 2011. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,104246,00.html. 
  8. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/11/27/thanksgiving.rdp/index.html. [dead link]
  9. "How Bush was whisked to Iraq". BBC News. November 28, 2003. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3245120.stm. Retrieved April 10, 2010. 
  10. "Iraqis mourn Shia massacre dead". BBC News. March 3, 2004. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3527221.stm. Retrieved April 10, 2010. 
  11. Peter Baker (2006-10-24). "Bush's New Tack Steers Clear of 'Stay the Course'". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/23/AR2006102301053.html. 
  12. At least 26 dead as bombs, shootings shatter Iraq lull. Retrieved on 11 February 2009
  13. U.S. Casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom January 2009. GlobalSecurity.Org, Retrieved on 12 February 2009
  14. U.K. Finishes Withdrawal of Its Last Combat Troops in Iraq
  15. Iraq coalition casualty count
  16. "Last US combat brigade leaves Iraq". Al Jazeera English. 20 August 2012. http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2010/08/201081818840122963.html. Retrieved 21 July 2012. 
  17. "3d Cavalry Regiment Wikipedia". 15 March 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3d_Armored_Cavalry_Regiment. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 


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