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USCGC Cayuga (1932)
File:USCGC Cayuga.jpg
USCGC Cayuga (1932) underway, circa 1936.
Career (United States) Ensign of the United States Coast Guard.svg
Name: USCGC Cayuga (1932)
Namesake: Lake Cayuga
Builder: Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp.
Launched: 7 October 1931
Commissioned: 22 March 1932
Decommissioned: 12 May 1941
Fate: Transferred to Royal Navy
12 May 1941
Career (United Kingdom) Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Name: HMS Totland (Y 88)
Namesake: Totland Bay
Launched: 7 Oct 1931
Commissioned: 12 May 1941
Decommissioned: May 1946
Fate: Returned to USCG
May 1946
Career (United States) Ensign of the United States Coast Guard.svg
Name: USCGC Macoma (WPG-163)
Namesake: Macoma
Recommissioned: 20 March 1947
Decommissioned: 8 May 1950
Fate: Sold on 15 July 1955
General characteristics
Class & type:
Displacement: 2,075 long tons (2,108 t)
Length: 250 ft (76 m)
Draft: 12 feet 11 inches (3.94 m)
Propulsion: 1 × General Electric turbine-driven 3,350 shp (2,500 kW) electric motor, 2 boilers
Speed: 14.8 kn (27.4 km/h; 17.0 mph) cruising
17.5 kn (32.4 km/h; 20.1 mph) maximum
Complement: 97 (in 1940)
Armament:

The USCGC Cayuga (1932) was a Lake-class cutter belonging to the United States Coast Guard launched on 7 October 1931 and commissioned on 22 March 1932.[1] She was eventually transferred to the Royal Navy where she served as the HMS Totland (Y 88), a Banff-class sloop from 1941 to 1946.[2] After being returned to the USCG in 1946, she was recommissioned the USCGC Macoma 20 March 1947.

CareerEdit

Coast Guard – CayugaEdit

The Cayuga served the USCG for nine years in New London, Connecticut and was responsible for ice breaking in Buzzards Bay.[3] On 5 April 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt transferred ten 250-foot cutters from the United States Coast Guard to the United Kingdom as part of the Lend-Lease Act.[3]

Royal Navy – TotlandEdit

After being commissioned 12 May 1941,[4] the Totland sailed to England with convoy HX 128. After refit on the River Thames, Totland escorted convoys OS 4, SL 89, OS 12, SL 95, OS 17, SL 100, OS 22, SL 106, OS 28, SL 112, OS 40, and SL 124 with the 42nd Escort Group before being assigned to Operation Torch. After escorting convoys KMF 3, MKF 3, KMF 5, MKF 5, KMF 7 and MKF 7 in support of the North African invasion, Totland sank U-522 on 23 February 1943 while escorting the tanker convoys UC 1 and CU 1.[5] Totland then escorted convoys between Freetown and Lagos via Sekondi-Takoradi until transferred to the Kilindini Escort Force in July 1944. Totland began a prolonged refit in October 1944 until the decision to retire her in May 1945.[6]

Coast Guard – MocomaEdit

After service in the Royal Navy, she was returned to the USCG in 1946.[3] After reconditioning, 20 March 1947 she was recommissioned USCGC Mocoma (WPG-163) and was placed in service to be stationed in Miami, Florida where she remained until her decommissioning on 8 May 1950. She was later sold on 15 July 1955 to an unknown party.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Helgason, Guðmundur. "USCGC Cayuga". http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/11111.html. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  2. Helgason, Guðmundur. "HMS Totland (Y 88)". http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/47.htmll. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Cayuga, 1932". United States Coast Guard. 17 November 2014. http://www.uscg.mil/history/webcutters/Cayuga1932.asp. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  4. Blair, Clay (1996). Hitler's U-Boat War, The Hunters 1939–1942. Random House. p. 744. ISBN 0-394-58839-8. 
  5. Blair, Clay (1998). Hitler's U-Boat War, The Hunted 1942–1945. Random House. p. 197. ISBN 0-679-45742-9. 
  6. "HMS Totland, cutter". Naval-History.net. http://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-16CGC-Totland.htm#convoy. Retrieved 2011-09-01. 



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