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USRC Massachusetts II (1793)
USRC Massachusetts (1791)
A Revenue Marine cutter, possibly Massachusetts II
Career (U.S.) Flag of the United States (1777–1795).svg
Name: Massachusetts II
Operator: Revenue Cutter Service
Builder: Adna Bates, Cohasset, Massachusetts[1]
Cost: US$1,600 [1]
Completed: June 1793[1]
Fate: Sold June 1804 for US$900[2]
General characteristics
Class & type: Sloop
Displacement: less than 45 tons[3]
Propulsion: Sail
Complement: 2 officers, 4 crewmen[3]

Massachusetts II was a small sloop operated by the Revenue-Marine used in the collection of customs duties.[Note 1] She was completed in June 1793 and replaced Massachusetts, one of the first ten cutters of the Revenue-Marine, when it was determined that the older ship was too large and slow to perform her assigned tasks.[1] Massachusetts II was constructed by Adna Bates of Cohasset, Massachusetts for a cost of US$1,600.[1] Her area of operation was along the Massachusetts coast as a smaller less expensive replacement to the original Massachusetts. When the original Massachusetts was sold at auction, the second and third mates were discharged and Massachusetts II was manned by two officers and four crewmen.[3] Massachusetts II was sold in June 1804 for US$900.[2]

NotesEdit

Footnotes
  1. The Revenue-Marine was the early name for the United States Revenue Cutter Service which merged in 1915 with the United States Life-Saving Service to form the United States Coast Guard.
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 King, p 13
  2. 2.0 2.1 Canney, p 4
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Evans, p 18
References used
  • Canney, Donald L. (1995). U.S. Coast Guard and Revenue Cutters, 1790–1935. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland. ISBN 978-1-55750-101-1. 
  • Evans, Stephen H. (1949). The United States Coast Guard 1790–1915: A Definitive History. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland. 
  • King (1989), Irving H. (1989). The Coast Guard Under Sail: The U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, 1789–1865. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland. ISBN 978-0-87021-234-5. 
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External linksEdit

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