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USS Bainbridge (DD-1)
USS Bainbridge DD-1-650px.jpg
USS Bainbridge in an Asiatic port circa 1915–1916
Career (United States)
Name: USS Bainbridge
Namesake: Commodore William Bainbridge
Builder: Neafie and Levy Ship and Engine Building Company
Laid down: 15 August 1899
Launched: 27 August 1901
Commissioned: 12 February 1903
Decommissioned: 3 July 1919
Fate: Sold for scrap
General characteristics
Type: Bainbridge-class destroyer
Displacement: 420 tons/380 tonnes (normal), 592 tons/537 tonnes (full load)
Length: 250 ft (76 m)
Beam: 23 ft 1 in (7.04 m)
Draft: 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Propulsion:
  • 4 boilers
  • 2 engines
  • 8,000 hp (6,000 kW)
Speed: 28.4 kn (32.7 mph; 52.6 km/h)
Complement:
  • 3 officers
  • 72 enlisted men
Armament: 2 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal guns, 5 × 6-pounders (57 mm (2.2 in)), 2 × 18 in (460 mm) torpedo tubes

The second USS Bainbridge (DD-1) was the first destroyer in the United States Navy and the lead ship of her class. She was named for William Bainbridge.

Construction[edit | edit source]

The ship was launched on 27 August 1901 by Neafie and Levy Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, sponsored by Mrs. Bertram Greene (great-granddaughter of ship's namesake Commodore William Bainbridge), placed in reserve commission at Philadelphia on 24 November 1902, Lieutenant G. W. Williams in command, towed to Norfolk, Virginia, and placed in full commission on 12 February 1903.

Pre-World War I[edit | edit source]

Bainbridge departed Key West, Florida on 23 December and sailed via the Suez Canal to the Philippine Islands, arriving at Cavite on 14 April 1904. Between 1904 and 1917, she served with the 1st Torpedo Flotilla, Asiatic Fleet, except for two brief periods (17 January 1907-on 24 April 1908 and 24 April 1912-April 1913) when she was out of commission.

World War I[edit | edit source]

On 1 August, she departed Cavite for Port Said, Egypt, where she joined Squadron 2, U.S. Patrol Force on 25 September. Bainbridge served on patrol and convoy duty until on 15 July 1918, when she departed for the United States. She arrived at Charleston, South Carolina, 3 August and participated with the fleet in activities along the Atlantic coast until on 3 July 1919 when she was decommissioned at Philadelphia. She was sold on 3 January 1920 and broken up for scrap.

References[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]


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