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USS Bluefish (SS-222)
USS Bluefish;0822205
Career US flag 48 stars.svg
Builder: Electric Boat Company, Groton, Connecticut[1]
Laid down: 5 June 1942[1]
Launched: 21 February 1943[2]
Sponsored by: Mrs. Robert Y. Menzie
Commissioned: 24 May 1943[1]
Decommissioned: 12 February 1947[1]
Recommissioned: 7 January 1952[1]
Decommissioned: 20 November 1953[1]
Struck: 1 September 1958[1]
Fate: Sold for scrap, 8 June 1960[2]
General characteristics
Class & type: Gato-class diesel-electric submarine[2]
Displacement: 1,525 long tons (1,549 t) surfaced[2]
2,424 long tons (2,463 t) submerged[2]
Length: 311 ft 9 in (95.02 m)[2]
Beam: 27 ft 3 in (8.31 m)[2]
Draft: 17 ft (5.2 m) maximum[2]
Propulsion:
  • 4 × General Motors Model 16-248 V16 diesel engines driving electrical generators[3][4]
  • 2 × 126-cell Sargo batteries[5]
  • 4 × high-speed General Electric electric motors with reduction gears[3]
  • two propellers [3]
  • 5,400 shp (4.0 MW) surfaced[3]
  • 2,740 shp (2.0 MW) submerged[3]
Speed: 21 knots (39 km/h) surfaced[6]
9 kn (17 km/h) submerged[6]
Range: 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km) surfaced at 10 kn (19 km/h)[6]
Endurance: 48 hours at 2 kn (4 km/h) submerged[6]
75 days on patrol
Test depth: 300 ft (90 m)[6]
Complement: 6 officers, 54 enlisted[6]
Armament:

USS Bluefish (SS-222), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the bluefish.

Bluefish was laid down 5 June 1942 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, CT. She was launched 21 February 1943 (sponsored by Mrs. Robert Y. Menzie), and commissioned 24 May 1943, Commander George E. Porter (Class of 1932) in command.

Bluefish departed New London, Conn. 21 July and reported to Task Force 72 (TF 72) at Brisbane, Australia 21 August 1943. Between 9 September 1943 and 29 July 1945 she completed nine war patrols. Her operating area extended from the Netherlands East Indies to the waters south of Honshū. Bluefish sank 12 Japanese ships totaling 50,839 tons, including the destroyer Sanae (18 November 1943 at 04°52′N 122°07′E / 4.867°N 122.117°E / 4.867; 122.117); the submarine I-351[citation needed] (15 July 1945 at 04°30′N 110°00′E / 4.5°N 110°E / 4.5; 110), and a submarine chaser. In addition, Bluefish assisted Puffer (SS-268) in sinking a 5,135 ton tanker.

With the cessation of hostilities Bluefish returned to the United States, arriving at Philadelphia Navy Yard 9 October 1945. She was placed in the 16th Fleet and on 31 October moved to the Submarine Base, New London. She was later towed to Electric Boat Co., Groton, where she underwent repairs. On 12 June 1946 she returned to New London where she went out of commission in reserve 12 February 1947.

Bluefish was recommissioned 7 January 1952 at the Submarine Base, New London, and reported to Submarine Division 82, Atlantic Fleet. On 7 April she proceeded to Key West, Fla., and reported to Submarine Division 41 on 11 April. She operated along the Florida coast and in the Caribbean, engaging in local operations and training exercises until May 1953.

On 7 June 1953 Bluefish arrived at the Naval Base Portsmouth, N.H. Following pre-inactivation overhaul at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, she was placed out of commission in reserve at New London 20 November 1953.

Bluefish received ten battle stars for her World War II service.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Friedman, Norman (1995). U.S. Submarines Through 1945: An Illustrated Design History. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. pp. 285–304. ISBN 1-55750-263-3. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Bauer, K. Jack; Roberts, Stephen S. (1991). Register of Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1775-1990: Major Combatants. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. pp. 271–273. ISBN 0-313-26202-0. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Bauer, K. Jack; Roberts, Stephen S. (1991). Register of Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1775–1990: Major Combatants. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. pp. 275–280. ISBN 978-0-313-26202-9. 
  4. U.S. Submarines Through 1945 p. 261
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 U.S. Submarines Through 1945 pp. 305–311
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 U.S. Submarines Through 1945 pp. 305-311

External linksEdit


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