FANDOM

251,257 Pages

</td></tr></td></tr>
USS Orca (SP-726)
USS Orca (SP-726)
Private yacht Orca prior to her 1917-1918 U.S. Navy service as USS Orca (SP-726).
Career (United States) US flag 48 stars.svg
Name: USS Orca
Namesake: The orca or killer whale (previous name retained)
Builder: George Lawley & Son, Neponset, Massachusetts
Completed: 1901
Acquired: 17 May 1917
Commissioned: 8 May 1917
Decommissioned: 30 December 1918
Struck: 18 August 1919
Fate: Sold 2 February 1920
Notes: Operated as private yacht Monaloa and Orca 1901-1917
General characteristics
Type: Patrol vessel
Displacement: 37 tons
Length: 85 ft 0 in (25.91 m)
Beam: 11 ft 8 in (3.56 m)
Draft: 4 ft 3 in (1.30 m)
Speed: 12.5 knots
Complement: 15
Armament: 1 x 1-pounder gun
1 x machine gun

The first USS Orca (SP-726) was a yacht that served in the United States Navy as a patrol vessel from 1917 to 1918.

USS Orca (SP-726) exercising

USS Orca (SP-726) exercising at Rockland Section Base, Rockland, Maine, in 1918 with patrol vessels USS Content (SP-538) (left center background) and USS Kangaroo (SP-1284) (astern of Orca) and various small boats.

Orca was built as the steam yacht Monaloa by George Lawley & Son, Neponset, Massachusetts. Later renamed Orca, she was commissioned into the U.S. Navy for World War I service on 8 May 1917 with Boatswain F. D. Grassie in command and was formally purchased by the United States Government from S. W. Colten of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, on 17 May 1917.

Operating in the 1st Naval District, headquartered at Boston, Massachusetts, during World War I, Orca patrolled in and around Boston throughout her naval career.

She was moored to Fishe Wharf, Boston, from October to December 1918. In December, she steamed to Quincy, Massachusetts, where she decommissioned on 30 December 1918.

Orca was struck from the Naval Register and ordered sold on 18 August 1919. She was sold to Frazer Brace and Company of New York City on 2 February 1920.

ReferencesEdit

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.