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*The task of assembling troops in the concentration area between [[Verdun]] and the Forest of Argonne was complicated by the fact that many American units were currently engaged in the [[Battle of Saint-Mihiel|St. Mihiel]] battle. Some 600,000 Americans had to be moved into the Argonne sector while 220,000 French moved out. Responsibility for solving this tricky logistical problem fell to Col. [[George C. Marshall]], Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations), [[US 1st Army|First Army]]. In the ten-day period after [[Battle of Saint-Mihiel|St. Mihiel]] the necessary troop movements were accomplished, but many untried divisions had to be placed in the vanguard of the attacking forces.
 
*The task of assembling troops in the concentration area between [[Verdun]] and the Forest of Argonne was complicated by the fact that many American units were currently engaged in the [[Battle of Saint-Mihiel|St. Mihiel]] battle. Some 600,000 Americans had to be moved into the Argonne sector while 220,000 French moved out. Responsibility for solving this tricky logistical problem fell to Col. [[George C. Marshall]], Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations), [[US 1st Army|First Army]]. In the ten-day period after [[Battle of Saint-Mihiel|St. Mihiel]] the necessary troop movements were accomplished, but many untried divisions had to be placed in the vanguard of the attacking forces.
   
*On the {{convert|20|mi|km|adj=on}} Meuse-Argonne front where the main American attack w to be made, Pershing disposed three corps side by side, each with three divisions in line and one in corps reserve. In the center was the [[US V Corps|V Corps]] (from right to left the [[U.S. 79th Infantry Division|79th]], [[37th Infantry Division (United States)|37th]], and [[91st Infantry Division (United States)|91st Division]]s with the [[32nd Infantry Division (United States)|32d]] in reserve), which would strike the decisive blow. On the right was the [[U.S. III Corps|III Corps]] (from right to left the [[33rd Infantry Division (United States)|33d]], [[U.S. 80th Infantry Division|80th]], and [[U.S. 4th Infantry Division|4th Division]]s with the 3d in reserve), which would move up the west aide of the Meuse. On the left was the [[US I Corps|I Corps]] (from right to left the [[U.S. 35th Infantry Division|35th]], [[U.S. 28th Infantry Division|28th]], and [[77th Infantry Division (United States)|77th Division]]s with the [[92nd Infantry Division (United States)|92d]] in reserve), which would advance parallel to the [[French Fourth Army]] on its left. Eastward across the Meuse the American front extended in direct line some {{convert|60|mi|km}}; this sector was held by two French Corps (IV and II Colonial) and the [[US IV Corps|American IV Corps]] in the St. Mihiel sector. Pershing had available to support his offensive nearly 4000 guns, two-thirds manned by American artillerymen; 190 light French tanks, mostly with American personnel; and some 820 aircraft, 600 of them flown by Americans.
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*On the {{convert|20|mi|km|adj=on}} Meuse-Argonne front where the main American attack w to be made, Pershing disposed three corps side by side, each with three divisions in line and one in corps reserve. In the center was the [[US V Corps|V Corps]] (from right to left the [[U.S. 79th Infantry Division|79th]], [[37th Infantry Division (United States)|37th]], and [[91st Infantry Division (United States)|91st Division]]s with the [[32nd Infantry Division (United States)|32d]] in reserve), which would strike the decisive blow. On the right was the [[U.S. III Corps|III Corps]] (from right to left the [[33rd Infantry Division (United States)|33d]], [[U.S. 80th Infantry Division|80th]], and [[U.S. 4th Infantry Division|4th Division]]s with the 3d in reserve), which would move up the west aide of the Meuse. On the left was the [[US I Corps|I Corps]] (from right to left the [[U.S. 35th Infantry Division|35th]], [[U.S. 28th Infantry Division|28th]], and [[77th Infantry Division (United States)|77th Division]]s with the [[92nd Infantry Division (United States)|92d]] in reserve), which would advance parallel to the [[French Fourth Army]] on its left. Eastward across the Meuse the American front extended in direct line some {{convert|60|mi|km}}; this sector was held by two French Corps (IV and II Colonial) and the [[US IV Corps|American IV Corps]] in the [[St. Mihiel]] sector. Pershing had available to support his offensive nearly 4000 guns, two-thirds manned by American artillerymen; 190 light French tanks, mostly with American personnel; and some 820 aircraft, 600 of them flown by Americans.
   
 
*The Meuse-Argonne Offensive falls into three phases. During the initial phase (26 September – 3 October) the First Army advanced through most of the southern Meuse-Argonne region, captured enemy strong points, seized the first two German defense lines, and then stalled before the third line. Failure of tank support, a difficult supply situation, and the inexperience of American troops all contributed to checking its advance.
 
*The Meuse-Argonne Offensive falls into three phases. During the initial phase (26 September – 3 October) the First Army advanced through most of the southern Meuse-Argonne region, captured enemy strong points, seized the first two German defense lines, and then stalled before the third line. Failure of tank support, a difficult supply situation, and the inexperience of American troops all contributed to checking its advance.

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