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Through the 20th century, medical discoveries continued to be found by Army researchers from the Army Medical School as U.S. military presence grew across the globe. Between 1900 and [[World War I]] (WWI), they showed that the cause of dengue fever was a filterable virus. They showed that parasites cause [[amebic dysentery]] and discovered a treatment for it. A vaccine against typhoid and a simple test for syphilis were developed. [[Water chlorination|Chlorination]] as a method to disinfect drinking water was invented by Institute researchers. These and other advances in medicine, sanitation and hygiene were used by troops during WWI. By WWI, Army researchers from the Army Medical School were working in Asia and the Americas.<ref>https://wrair-www.army.mil/index.php?view=100years</ref>
 
Through the 20th century, medical discoveries continued to be found by Army researchers from the Army Medical School as U.S. military presence grew across the globe. Between 1900 and [[World War I]] (WWI), they showed that the cause of dengue fever was a filterable virus. They showed that parasites cause [[amebic dysentery]] and discovered a treatment for it. A vaccine against typhoid and a simple test for syphilis were developed. [[Water chlorination|Chlorination]] as a method to disinfect drinking water was invented by Institute researchers. These and other advances in medicine, sanitation and hygiene were used by troops during WWI. By WWI, Army researchers from the Army Medical School were working in Asia and the Americas.<ref>https://wrair-www.army.mil/index.php?view=100years</ref>
   
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Into [[World War II]] (WWII), investigations into [[dengue]], malaria, combat stress, [[wound treatment]], [[chemical weapons]], and military dentistry continued in preparation for the US military to meet new challenges and threats. One such threat was [[Japanese encephalitis]] and the Institute was responsible for developing the first vaccine to combat it.
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Into [[World War II]] (WWII), investigations into [[dengue]], [[malaria]], combat stress, [[wound treatment]], [[chemical weapons]], and military dentistry continued in preparation for the US military to meet new challenges and threats. One such threat was [[Japanese encephalitis]] and the Institute was responsible for developing the first vaccine to combat it.
   
 
Since the end of WWII, WRAIR has evolved to continue serving Soldiers. The risks of nuclear weapons and chemical or biological warfare were added as new military health threats in the post-WWII era. As well, WRAIR researchers have contributed considerable gains in global medicine. For example, the Institute is responsible for the development of vaccines to prevent [[hepatitis A]], meningococcal meningititis, and [[adenovirus]] that caused respiratory disease. In addition, WRAIR researchers have produced two highly effective [[antimalarial drugs]] and are currently working on an effective malaria vaccine.<ref>https://wrair-www.army.mil/index.php?view=100years</ref> WRAIR's medical contributions protect military and civilian populations worldwide.
 
Since the end of WWII, WRAIR has evolved to continue serving Soldiers. The risks of nuclear weapons and chemical or biological warfare were added as new military health threats in the post-WWII era. As well, WRAIR researchers have contributed considerable gains in global medicine. For example, the Institute is responsible for the development of vaccines to prevent [[hepatitis A]], meningococcal meningititis, and [[adenovirus]] that caused respiratory disease. In addition, WRAIR researchers have produced two highly effective [[antimalarial drugs]] and are currently working on an effective malaria vaccine.<ref>https://wrair-www.army.mil/index.php?view=100years</ref> WRAIR's medical contributions protect military and civilian populations worldwide.

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