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XV Royal Bavarian Reserve Corps
XV. Königlich Bayerisches Reserve-Korps
Stab eines Generalkommandos.svg
Flag of the Staff of a Generalkommando (1871–1918)
Active 1 September 1914 - post November 1918
Country  Bavaria /  German Empire
Type Corps
Engagements World War I

The XV Royal Bavarian Reserve Corps / XV Bavarian RK (German language: XV. Königlich Bayerisches Reserve-Korps) was a corps level command of the Royal Bavarian Army, part of the German Army, in World War I.[lower-alpha 1]

History[]

The Corps was formed on 1 September 1914 as the temporary Corps Eberhardt[1] named for its commander General der Infanterie Magnus von Eberhardt, military governor of Strasbourg, then in the German Imperial territory of Alsace-Lorraine.[2] On 1 December 1914 it was established as XV Reserve Corps and on 1 September 1916 it was renamed as XV Bavarian Reserve Corps. It was still in existence at the end of the war[3] in Armee-Abteilung A, Heeresgruppe Herzog Albrecht von Württemberg on the Western Front.[4]

Commanders[]

Korps Eberhardt / XV Reserve Corps / XV Bavarian Reserve Corps had the following commanders during its existence:[5][6]

From Rank Name
1 September 1914 General der Infanterie Magnus von Eberhardt
16 October 1916 General der Artillerie Maximilian von Höhn[7]
8 August 1918 Generalleutnant Paul von Kneußl

See also[]

Notes[]

  1. From the late 1800s, the Prussian Army was effectively the German Army as, during the period of German unification (1866-1871), the states of the German Empire entered into conventions with Prussia regarding their armies. Only the Bavarian Army remained fully autonomous and came under Prussian control only during wartime.

References[]

  1. Cron 2002, p. 88
  2. The Prussian Machine Accessed: 23 March 2012
  3. Cron 2002, pp. 88–89
  4. Ellis & Cox 1993, pp. 186–187
  5. "German War History". http://www.deutsche-kriegsgeschichte.de/akrkgk.html. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  6. "Armee-Reserve-Korps". The Prussian Machine. http://home.comcast.net/~jcviser/army/corps2.htm. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  7. Promoted to General der Artillerie on the same date. "Maximilian Ritter von Höhn". The Prussian Machine. http://home.comcast.net/~jcviser/aka/hoehn.htm. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 

Bibliography[]

  • Cron, Hermann (2002). Imperial German Army 1914-18: Organisation, Structure, Orders-of-Battle [first published: 1937]. Helion & Co. ISBN 1-874622-70-1. 
  • Ellis, John; Cox, Michael (1993). The World War I Databook. Aurum Press Ltd. ISBN 1-85410-766-6. 
  • Histories of Two Hundred and Fifty-One Divisions of the German Army which Participated in the War (1914-1918), compiled from records of Intelligence section of the General Staff, American Expeditionary Forces, at General Headquarters, Chaumont, France 1919. The London Stamp Exchange Ltd (1989). 1920. ISBN 0-948130-87-3. 
  • The German Forces in the Field; 7th Revision, 11th November 1918; Compiled by the General Staff, War Office. Imperial War Museum, London and The Battery Press, Inc (1995). 1918. ISBN 1-870423-95-X. 


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